DNA Model Art Projects

The DNA model is an extremely interesting thing and its art projects are personal masterpieces for your home. DNA is basically a scientific genetic code which proves each one of us is his/her own unique being.

DNA 11 have decided to combine each person’s unique code with his or her own art piece for home or office. As the pictures illustrate, we can clearly see a difference in each portrait. Since each individual DNA is different, no art project is the same, therefore creating a completely original print.

We have seen other code influences such as Ascii art made by printing ascii code on usable and practical curtains, but this provides a completely different personal artistic touch to your home.

By a simple saliva swab, you can provide your own DNA breakdown which may be made into an art portrait based on the design specs you select. If you like a certain print more than others, you can either re-swab, or ask them if they have a cloning possibility.

Via: FunIs2Cool

22 thoughts on “DNA Model Art Projects

  1. Pingback: The Art of DNA!

  2. SS .

    Also dug this up from earlier this year.


    A photo of a gel we ran with DNA from several bees numbered 1-16 (1-8 were on a seperate gel). Each lane has DNA describing an enzyme abundant in bee wing muscle cells (Malate dehydrogenase). The PUC19/HPA2 lanes serve as a sort of ruler, telling you how long the fragments are.

  3. SS .

    DNA can be thought of as a terrifically long book written in one line, with 4 letters.

    Basically, to get these images, the process is akin to taking the line, cutting it wherever a certain sequence of letters appears, then sorting the fragments based on size. In reality what happens is the DNA is mixed in with restriction enzymes, molecules that do the selective cutting, then placed on a gel. A current is then passed through the gel which makes the fragments of DNA move in the direction of the current (since DNA has an electric charge). Smaller fragments travel further than the larger ones and if you mess with the image a bit or add chemicals to make the fragments glow in the dark, those images are what you get.

    Those bars are fragments of DNA placed in that ‘column’, I think the trails are from the dye not binding properly to the DNA or something, and different columns tend to be the same piece of DNA cut at different places or comparisons of different sections/samples of DNA cut with the same enzymes.

    The process is called gel electrophoresis if you want to read up on it, and it’s really quite simple. The hardest part is getting enough pure DNA to run on a gel, which we tend to use a process called PCR to do overnight after isolating a small amount of DNA.


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