Martin Luther King Recreated in 4,242 Rubik’s Cubes

People usually take years to solve the puzzle of Rubik’s cube and most of us usually give up after months of seemingly endless problem solving. However, there are many of us who also swear by these little puzzle cubes, that it has almost reached a cult status all over the world.

With that in mind, you might want to know more about this art work which juxtaposes two different symbols which are not related at all. Martin Luther King, Jr’s portrait which is made of 4,242 Rubik’s cubes is completely baffling, and is difficult to understand what could actually be common between the two. A beacon and symbol of the Civil rights movement in the U.S.A, Martin Luther King was far from being a post-millennial geek. At the same time, Rubik’s cube is a symbol of geekhood in its own right, and when geek artist Pete Fecteau dreamed about a Rubik’s cube portrait of Mart Luther King; he just had to take it up, even if it meant crossing all borders of craziness!

In fact, it is almost surreal as the artist was inspired by his own dream, and the task of twisting and turning 4242 Rubik’s cubes to achieve the same pixelated form as that was seen in his own dream is nothing short of a surreal interpretation of geek culture and social rights. Perhaps, the artist may not realize, but in a way the portrait may signify how Internet, technology and science has helped to build bridges between nations, and helped us all to interact more with each other, which was not possible in the days of Martin Luther King.

Perhaps, the Rubik’s cube portrait of Martin Luther King also signifies technology’s contributions towards building communities, no matter how puzzling each micro-community is. That is exactly what King did, build bridges and trust between racial groups of U.S.A. Pete Fecteau took more than a year to finish the art project, but the results are mind blowing. You could also go ahead and read about the Rubik’s Cube Drawers and the Rubik’s Cube Solving Robot, which we had covered some time back.

One thought on “Martin Luther King Recreated in 4,242 Rubik’s Cubes

  1. Pingback: I have a Dream, a Cubic Dream | In Good Taste

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